From the monthly archives: "July 2014"

??????eIn response to a question from a listener, we decided to look at the field of wilderness EMS medicine, another austere medicine practice, to see what similarities or differences there are between the two. While they both operate within constraints of supplies and resources, their differences are striking. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined by Dr. Joe Holley to dig in to this topic.

While looking into it, they got onto the topic of best supplies to carry when load and space is at a premium. Joe shocked both Sam and Jamie with the inclusion of a foley catheter in his list of things he can’t live without on deployment. He then began to list all the things it could be used for, including both medical and mundane uses. You have to listen to the whole episode to hear it all!

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Flying-Drone-AerialIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast, hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by paramedic Jim Logan from Paragon Medical Education Group. The three of them pick up on a topic found in the news this week by Jamie on using consumer aerial drones while visiting national parks. It occurred to him that these devices would be valuable tools for search and rescue, as well as general recon during a disaster response.

Jim brought up an incident where his system used a volunteer citizen with a drone to try and locate a group of teenagers allegedly missing in a flood situation in Memphis recently. While the responders couldn’t use the private device themselves, they watched over the shoulder of the citizen while he piloted the drone downstream looking for the teens.

Responders and disaster units will need to develop new rules and standard operating procedures for using these types of devices before they can be regularly used. Still, there is an opportunity here to come up with numerous ways to get these tools in the field and the Disaster Podcast team discusses some of them in this episode.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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active shooter responseIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast, hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by paramedic Jim Logan and Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. The four of them kick off a discussion on the changing view of standard of care for victims in active shooter situations.

While for years the standard of care for EMS and other medical responders was to stage in a safe area and only enter the scene when if was fully secured by the responding police agencies. Analyzing injury patterns and autopsy data from recent incidents of violence around the country has led responders to a paradigm shift to allow for rapid care of victims soon after responders arrive.

The plan is to bring EMS in to “warm” zones, areas cleared by police as they enter the building. The EMS providers will have their own security team of police to watch over them while they begin immediate, lifesaving treatment for victims and then removing them from the scene for more definitive care and transport in a safer area.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Concert-Park-Event-FestivalIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast, hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. The three of them pick up on a topic mentioned in last week’s episode where they were talking about the differences between Event Medicine and Disaster Medicine.

At this time of year, all over the country, there are festivals, fairs and other large scale events going on that require local resources to adjust their normal operations in order to handle the overload of patients and community needs. In this episode of the Disaster Podcast, Joe, Sam and Jamie all discuss how these cases have both similarities and differences from typical disaster responses.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Flood in 2014 - Maglaj - Bosnia And HerzegovinaIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast, hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. The panel chats about the ways major disaster responses are set up from the initial responders on scene through the follow-up help from State, regional and Federal resources as needed.

It’s noted by the group that first local responders must request assistance from their higher chain of command. That is usually up to the state level. At that point the Governor must issue a disaster declaration and through a very specific set of language, request aid from federal or regional resources. It is this specific language in the request that determines the type of support that is called in.

The challenge for local and state resources is that it takes 72 hours (3 days) to mobilize federal resources and get them on site. This means that all local resources must be prepared to operate independently in the event of a disaster for up to 3 days without further assistance from outside.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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