Currently viewing the tag: "training"

Military-Hospital-UkraineRandall Hunter returns to the Disaster Podcast again this week with part 2 of an episode started last week. Podcast hosts, Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley continue to talk about the planning and preparation that goes into the response to disaster. Hunter, as he is called by his DMAT team, relates stories of the massive planning and logistical supply challenges that accompanied their deployment to the Ukraine.

This segment is part two of a two-part episode with Hunter. The first half was released last week with Hunter and Sam talking about the California DMAT team’s deployment to Hurricane Katrina and the logistical challenges associated with that response.

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Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Man Rappelling On Building While Aiming With GunThis week on the Disaster Podcast host Sam Bradley and I had paramedic and emergency planner for Memphis Fire Department Jim Logan on the show to talk about Sam’s experience with the Urban Shield program that is run in her county to train people for tactical emergencies. It is a comprehensive full-scale regional preparedness exercise that assesses the overall Bay Area UASI Region’s response capabilities related to multi-discipline planning, policies, procedures, organization, equipment and training.

The Urban Shield Program:

  • Provides a platform for national and international first responders, as well as the private sector, to work efficiently and effectively together when critical incidents occur.
  • Expands regional collaboration including local businesses and critical infrastructure.
  • Tests regional integrated systems for prevention, protection, response and recovery in our high-threat, high-density urban area.
  • Evaluates our existing level of preparedness and capabilities
  • The previous years’ After Action Reports are referenced and used to assist in prioritizing needs
  • Enhances the skills and abilities of regional first responders, as well as those responsible for coordinating and managing large scale events.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

active shooter responseIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast, hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined again by paramedic Jim Logan and Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. The four of them kick off a discussion on the changing view of standard of care for victims in active shooter situations.

While for years the standard of care for EMS and other medical responders was to stage in a safe area and only enter the scene when if was fully secured by the responding police agencies. Analyzing injury patterns and autopsy data from recent incidents of violence around the country has led responders to a paradigm shift to allow for rapid care of victims soon after responders arrive.

The plan is to bring EMS in to “warm” zones, areas cleared by police as they enter the building. The EMS providers will have their own security team of police to watch over them while they begin immediate, lifesaving treatment for victims and then removing them from the scene for more definitive care and transport in a safer area.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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hand holding gun active shooterOn this episode of the Disaster Podcast host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic caught up with a team of educators from Paragon Medical Education Group in Nashville, Tennessee by phone after they had taught a two-day active shooter training class for a group of diverse responders and medical professionals. Included in the class were emergency medical services responders (EMS) like EMTs and paramedics, police officers, fire fighters and hospital staff like doctors and nurses.

The focus of the class was to teach them how to work together to save lives immediately after the onset of these incidents. The goal is to work more closely with police officers clearing the scene so that injured victims can be treated quickly enough to save lives that had previously been lost due to rapid blood loss from wounds.

This is a challenge for first responders who have been taught for years to “stage” at a safe distance until the shooter is found and the building cleared. This scene safety paradigm is changing so that EMS crews enter the scene right behind police officers who quickly establish a safe perimeter around victims so that paramedics and EMTs can treat and transport victims more rapidly.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Train-CrashLast week the Disaster Podcast host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic along with co-host Sam Bradley sat down with Dr. Holley and Jim Logan from Paragon Medical Education Group to talk about their educational experience program at EMS Today. The focus is on the importance of training.

Stress Immersion Training Explained

Disaster responders like all responders, need training specific to what they are expected to do and experience in a deployment. The need to be able to not only take care of the communities to which they respond, they also need to be able to care for themselves and their team mates at the same time. Jim Logan says the best training is something he calls “Stress Immersion” which most closely resembles the things they’ll actually encounter in the field.

The Cadaver Lab conducted by Paragon Education Group at EMS Today is a great example of the type of class in which you get this “stress immersion” training. Those basic skills that are often relegated to the low-man on the team are still essential skills to be mastered and practiced. Joe Holley also points out that a disaster responder needs to not only know how to do something but also why they do a particular intervention.

In disaster response situations, the USAR (Urban Search and Rescue) teams and the DMAT (Disaster Medical Aid Team) members all need to be self-reliant and learn to manage and treat patients without the common supplies or resources commonly available in the hospital. You don’t have expensive imaging tools, diagnostic machines, or even lab work in some situations. The disaster responder is forced to fall back on basic skills and history taking to make diagnostic, treatment, and transport decisions.

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