From the monthly archives: "April 2017"
snake bite awareness
Make sure you check out part one of this episode from last week!
In part two of the episode, we look at what to carry for snake bite during disaster response. Basic wide bandages, duct tape, quick clot bandages and general first aid supplies are what Dr. Ben Abo (benabo@ufl.edu) carries when traveling to wilderness locations. Dr. Joe Holley and the Tennessee Task Force One USAR Team carry CroFab – the synthetic pit viper antivenin.
For non-indigenous snakes, such as exotic pets that get loose, many systems have to reach out to local and regional zoos to get the necessary venom treatments for exotic snakes. In the Miami region, there are special venom teams such as Venom One. Poison centers around the country can reach out to them and gain access to specialized knowledge and logistical assistance to transport the antivenin for a specific bite. Dr. Ben Abo makes the comment that with Venomous bites, logistics saves lives.
Make sure you check out part one of this episode from last week!

Check out this episode and if you have questions, leave them here or on our new disaster podcast Facebook Group.


Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

snake biteWe have Dr. Ben Abo (benabo@ufl.edu) on the show tonight to talk about some common myths about snake bite injuries. Before he comes on, Kyle Nelson (@WxKyleNelson), our resident severe and disaster weather expert, joins us to talk about the upcoming severe weather roundup. Also on the call is Dr. Joe Holley calling in from his home base in Memphis.
First are the old myths about coral snakes in North America. The rhyme about  “Red touch black, safe for Jack. Red touches yellow, kills a fellow” is only true for one variety of coral snake in North America. It’s also a myth that coral snakes have to “latch on” for the venom to transmit. The coral snake venom is a neurotoxin and the effects can be delayed for hours after the bite. The only treatment is the antivenin for that particular bite. There are often permanent effects depending on where the bite is located.

Pit Viper Snake Bite

Aside from the coral snake, most of the venomous snakes in North America are pit vipers (rattlesnakes, copperheads, water moccasins, etc.) The good news is that most of these use a common synthetic antivenin to treat all of them. The biggest problem is inappropriate field treatments. For pit vipers, which have a cellular toxin, it is NOT recommended to apply a tourniquet of any kind to the area above the wound. Otherwise, the toxin will pool in the area around the wound and cause additional cellular damage.
Other Snake Bite Don’ts:
Don’t chase after the snake.
Don’t try to capture the snake.
Don’t handle a dead snake. Even a dead snake’s fangs can envenom someone.
Make sure you check out part two of this episode next week!

Check out this episode and if you have questions, leave them here or on our new disaster podcast Facebook Group.


Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

Dr. Neal Richmond, MD

Dr. Neal Richmond, MD

In the second half of the call that started in part one last week, Dr. Neal Richmond discusses an example of understanding the real mechanics and psychological aspects of working in the field out of a classroom. He discusses helping providers understand the tiny incremental changes they need to implement to improve something like cardiac arrest survival in their communities.

We also discuss the importance of training across the systems that will respond in a community. Whether it be mutual aid organizations or split Fire/EMS departments who only interact on relatively few calls. Multi-agency training is an essential part of managing critical patients.
There is also a discussion on the merits of ongoing refresher training to maintain infrequently used skills. We can’t expect emergency responders to understand how to do the things they need to do without giving them the tools and opportunities to practice them.
If you want to reach out to Dr. Neal Richmond to find about how your system can improve the metrics they track and the QA systems you use, email him at nrichmond@medstar911.org.
Make sure you join us for part two of this informative episode next week.

Check out this episode and if you have questions, leave them here or on our new disaster podcast Facebook Group.


Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

Dr. Neal Richmond, MD

Dr. Neal Richmond, MD

Dr. Neal Richmond comes on the show this week in part one of a two-part episode to share his outlook on emergency response to disasters and mass casualty incidents (MCIs). He started his work with EMS in New York City when he became associated with FDNY. Then he moved to Louisville, Kentucky to help with medical direction in their system them. Lately, he’s been working with MedStar as a medical director.

Neal is interested in the differences between what we call disasters and what we call MCIs. Some may think they have a lot in common while others would point out the major differences (as Neal does). He starts off talking about the way some EMS responders wait for the “big one” which might occur once in a career, if ever. He proposes that if we look at the way some systems handle everyday, run of the mill EMS calls, that they add up to an MCI call all on their own because the responders drop the ball in some way.
The answer to the proposed question is that we can find answers within the data from these average calls with adverse patient events. When systems do really accurate quality assurance (QA), they have the information they need to identify the areas in need of change within a system. The important thing to do when these deficiencies are noted is to treat them as educational opportunities and not disciplinary opportunities.
If you want to reach out to Dr. Neal Richmond to find about how your system can improve the metrics they track and the QA systems you use, email him at nrichmond@medstar911.org.
Make sure you join us for part two of this informative episode next week.

Check out this episode and if you have questions, leave them here or on our new disaster podcast Facebook Group.


Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.