From the monthly archives: "November 2015"

Pulsara appApps that help responders communicate with Pulsara.com in this episode of the Disaster Podcast. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined by Jim Logan and Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group in this special interview episode of the podcast.  We interview Dr. James T Woodson, a board certified Emergency Physician and the CEO and Founder of Pulsara.

Pulsara is a novel mobile app that keeps responders and hospital staffs connected throughout specific emergencies like heart attack, strokes, and others on the horizon. The thing that makes these emergencies similar is that they are all time-sensitive. By closely coordinating the staff response from the street paramedics through the entire hospital team, the providers can improve patient outcomes in ways that only advanced technology tools allow.

Future Pulsara Expansion Planned

The Disaster Podcast team asks about the potential to expand the app to cover other types of emergencies. In other time-sensitive situations, like active shooter attacks, the Pulsara app might be used to inform teams on the scene and in the hospital of the status of victims on the scene and inbound.

James tells us about the potential of the app to be expanded in many ways. There are plans to integrate many other types of emergencies in the future including things like code sepsis and more. The Disaster Podcast team is looking forward to the opportunity to follow this app as it continues to be developed in the future for other applications in healthcare.

You can find out more about the app and the team behind it by heading over to their site at Pulsara.com.

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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disaster preparedness kit-for-homeIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley gather some special guests to talk about disaster preparedness issues that are more likely to be encountered given your region and location. Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group is on the call this week and EMS and preparedness educator Kevin Reiter is on the show.

The group talks this week about disaster preparedness using the usual disasters from your area. For example, California is more earthquake prone compared to other regions of the country. Memphis, along the Mississippi River, has to be prepared for floods as well as earthquakes due to the New Madrid Fault Line. Jamie is on the East Coast of the U.S. has to watch for potential for hurricanes and tropical storms.

Build A Home Disaster Kit

Once you know the disasters that are likely in your areas, it is incumbent on folks to prepare appropriately. The Federal Emergency Management Agency at Ready.gov proposes that everyone should have a disaster kit that includes enough resources (food, water, medicines, cash, etc.) to sustain you for at least 72 hours (3 days). Some areas that are more remote may need even more stores for longer durations.

A disaster supplies kit is simply a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency. Try to assemble your kit well in advance of an emergency. You may have to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you. You will probably not have time to search for the supplies you need or shop for them. You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own foodwater and other supplies in sufficient quantity to last for at least 72 hours. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours or it might take days.

Find out more about what Kevin Reiter is up to training people on water rescue and more at WildSafety.com, @WildSafety on Twitter, and you can email him at Training@wildsafety.com.

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Jonathon-Feit-expo-2015-screenshotThe Disaster Podcast crew loves stories of personal triumph over disease and injury that could otherwise be a disaster in a person’s life. Jonathon Feit has Tourette Syndrome, a neurological disorder that causes facial tics and other unintended movements. Ironically, Jonathon had been misdiagnosed for years and, at 19, was working in a neuromuscular lab when he was finally diagnosed. It could have devastated him, but he found the diagnosis freeing.

An intelligent young man, he went on to develop a number of products including EMS software that works even in disasters. Through the discussion, we can see his positive attitude is a much stronger part of him than his Tourette’s. He discusses being a new husband and father. Speaking with Jonathon was delightful and you’ll find as we did that he’s an inspiration to all of us.

Check out Jonathon’s Company BeyondLucid.com

Federal Resources on Tourette’s Syndrome

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group and the injury lawyers in Toronto for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Mike-Marsh-Disaster-Podcast-ScreenshotMike Marsh is back in his new role as Operations Chief for American Medical Response (AMR) in Contra Costa County, California. He is an AMR “Star of Life” recipient for his work in MCIs and disasters. Mike has been a frequent guest on the Disaster Podcast and we’ve talked to him about how ambulance companies can add value by starting tactical medical programs. We discussed his involvement in Urban Shield when he brought a herd of ambulances to Alameda County to exercise the Ambulance Strike Team.

Sam and Mike discussed the wide variety of options for EMTs and paramedics that didn’t exist that long ago like event medicine, community paramedicine, and tactical medicine. EMSer’s that take advantage of ancillary training, learn new skills and spread their wings in new areas are more likely to find more excitement and new potential in their careers.

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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