From the monthly archives: "September 2015"

disaster-clean-up-powerplusdcuSuperbug hospital clean-up is the topic of conversation this week on the Disaster Podcast. Join hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley, along with regular guest Dr. Joe Holley from the Paragon Medical Education Group as they chat with Kevin Wang from PowerPlusDCU.com. Kevin’s company is one of the premier disaster clean up specialists in the world.

At the request of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Kevin and his team were asked to come into a major U.S. hospital to swab surfaces in supposed clean and sterile environments. Kevin’s team found some very disturbing things when they revealed their results.

The podcast hosts and Dr. Joe Holley learned a new term in the process of listening to Kevin’s description of his team’s estimation of how clean things are in an infectious environment. The phrase was repeated -“TWSBE – That Which Should Be Evacuated – “Twisbee” now that’s scary! This refers to viral or bacterial load levels that, when detected in a situation with a lethal agent, should prompt the crews involved to get out of Dodge!

In the CDC hospital sample taken by Kevin and his team, he found numerous situations of TWiSBE in supposedly superbug clean-up rooms and sterile operating suites. While not necessarily a risk for healthy adults, these situations pose potentially catastrophic risks for sick and immune-compromised individuals. Kevin had several recommendations for hospitals out there to instantly improve their infection control programs and room cleaning procedures. Listen to the podcast and see what your system is doing right or wrong in healthcare superbug clean-up.

PowerPlusDCU on Twitter

PowerPlusDCU on Facebook

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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disaster-clean-up-powerplusdcuMajor disaster clean-up is the topic of conversation this week on the Disaster Podcast. Join hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley, along with regular guest Dr. Joe Holley from the Paragon Medical Education Group as they chat with Kevin Wang from PowerPlusDCU.com. Kevin’s company is one of the premier disaster clean up specialists in the world.

PowerPlusDCU has been around since they started working on projects like the Exxon Valdez oil spill clean-up in Alaska. At Hurricane Katrina, they were able to come up with solutions to cleaning waste water so that it was safe to drink as well as create unique solutions for disaster clean-up and first responder crews to create power from multiple fuel sources.

For the BP Gulf oil spill, PowerPlusDCU created an oil/water separator that not only separates the two fluids, but also collects the raw oil for regular petroleum refining after the fact. There is very little waste that ends up in the landfills from the process. They also created cleaning equipment and solutions that could be used on everything from concrete to live animals. Their contribution to disaster clean-up is impressive.

Perhaps the most impressive feat is the efforts they took to clean radioactive residue from living soil and plants in Japan following the Fukushima power plant disaster. Their processes and partnerships have become the standard for nuclear disaster cleanup around the world. Check the whole podcast episode out and gain a new respect for this unsung aspect of disaster response and its aftermath. You’ll find more with Kevin Wang as well in next week’s episode where we will be covering his efforts to help the CDC with true and effective cleaning of superbugs from the hospital environment.

PowerPlusDCU on Twitter

PowerPlusDCU on Facebook

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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wildland-firefighting-forest-fireThis week we look at the recent wildfires covering many areas of the west coast. Disaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are on the show. They are joined by podcast regulars Dr. Joe Holley and Jim Logan from the Paragon Medical Education Group. Also joining the team is paramedic Norm Rooker, a man with 40+ years as a paramedic and a person who now spends his time on major wildfires as a medical support paramedic for fire crews in the camps set up to fight those fires.

What kind of challenges face crews working on the wildland firefighting tasks around the country? Norm shares his vast experience with the team and talks about how crews stay healthy and effective when deployed for long stints on the fire ground. With fires affecting many parts of the pacific northwest in northern California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, how do these crews work together and what gear do they find indispensible in camp and on the trail? We’ll find out in this conversation with Norm.

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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china explosionThis week on the show, Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley talk about a variety of recent disaster-related topics in the news recently. They are joined by Dr. Joe Holley and paramedic Jim Logan from Paragon Medical Education Group as they discuss these recent disasters.

We talk about the port district explosion in China that killed numerous first responders and firefighters. Storage of toxic and explosive chemicals is a risk for local responders and the surrounding communities. In this situation, the responders did not know what they were facing until it was too late. Joe and Jim share their expertise on urban search and rescue situations where there are hazardous materials in place.

Next up Jamie fills the team in on a plane crash in mountainous terrain in Indonesia that challenged local rescuers. It took rescue and recovery teams two days to get to the downed aircraft and the bodies of the passengers and crew. This harkens back to our episode with Dr. Seth Hawkins on the challenges of wilderness medicine in mountainous terrain.

Finally, Sam closes things out with a cute story of two teens struck by lightning while holding hands. The ER doctor that treated them told them that holding hands saved their lives. Dr. Joe cringes as he hears that part of the story. Lightning is a very real danger to crews working outside in bad weather. Holding hands probably won’t save you.

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Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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