From the monthly archives: "August 2015"

Tropical_Storm_Erika_PathThis week on the Disaster Podcast we are bumping some things in our regular reporting schedule to talk about two recent events that occurred. The team here at the show, as well as with our partners at Paragon Medical Education Group, thought that the topics deserved some discussion on this forum as they were disaster-related issues in the news.

On the show this week are podcast co-hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley and joining them are paramedic Jim Logan and Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group. The topics are the terrible on-air shooting that occurred with the news crew from Roanoke TV station WDBJ. Jamie asks Jim and Joe if they use lessons and ideas from events like this one to add to their ground-breaking Active Shooter Experience training evolutions.

Then the team shifts gears from an event that you cannot prepare much in advance for, to an event with plenty of advanced notice. As Tropical Storm Erica churns in the Atlantic near the Leeward Islands, the southeastern U.S. is in hurricane prep mode from the gulf coast to eastern Florida. Jim Logan shares some of the preparations as far away as Memphis, TN, where they are preparing for possible evacuees sent to shelter in their city. This occurs under federal and state disaster agreements that were put in place following Hurricane Katrina, which happened ten years ago this week.

Check out the links in this episode for more details on the topics and news items we discussed here. Stay tuned for next week’s episode when we discuss other news items that have been on people’s minds recently as well as curiously odd news stories that caught our eye.

—-

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

cardiac arrest resuscitation trainingThis week on the Disaster Podcast we have a very special episode for you. It’s a bit different that we’ve covered in the past, but it is an essential part of medical care at any level, including disaster medical care. Cardiac arrest is a major public health issue in the United States. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) cardiac arrest resuscitation statistics, over 300,000 people each year suffer a sudden cardiac arrest.

Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation Rates Too Low

The average rate of survival in the nation is around 8%. That means that of 300,000 patients, only 24,000 survive. That’s a national public health disaster. If we could improve those numbers, even slightly, and resuscitate say 10% of the sudden cardiac arrest patients or beyond it would save an additional 3,000 lives for every percentage point of change.

Our partners and sponsors here at the Disaster Podcast, Paragon Medical Education Group (@paragonmededu on Twitter), are involved in breaking the barriers of traditional medical education in all areas. We know from their previous episodes here on the Disaster Podcast that they specialize in Disaster education but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t involved with other areas of medical education and research. They have been doing some really incredible research into cardiac arrest resuscitation in association with Dr. Keith Lurie in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They are working on research into “Heads-up CPR” and the use of impedance threshold devices that reduce intra-thoracic pressures during compressions like the ResQPod and the ResQPump from Advanced Circulatory.

Check out this special segment on the groundbreaking, cutting edge research Dr. Joe Holley and paramedic Jim Logan are involved with at Paragon. They talk about early results and their efforts to create a cadaver-based model for education and demonstration of these devices and techniques for cardiac arrest resuscitation. They will also be demonstrating some of these things at EMS World Expo in Las Vegas Sept 16-19, 2015 for a limited VIP audience. You can find out how to get a first-hand look by asking about the Advanced Circulatory/Paragon demo in the Zoll booth (booth #1010) at the event.

—-

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

Radio-Controlled-Disaster-Robot-Drone-UAV-USARThis week on the Disaster Podcast we’re joined by Dr. Robin Murphy from Texas A&M University and the Center for Robotics And Search And Rescue (CRASAR.org). Robin is the expert we have been searching for regarding the use of robots in disaster and search and rescue operations.  She literally wrote the book on Disaster Robotics.

Disaster Robot USAR Applications

Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are also joined by Tennessee Task Force One USAR doc Joe Holley, MD. We all know Joe as a regular on the show and one of the amazing educators from our sponsor Paragon Medical Education Group.

Together the panel discusses how robots have been deployed historically at disasters like the World Trade Center on 9/11 and to Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi. They also address the unique challenges associated with using robots in rescue operations. Disaster Robot devices are tools to be used by human rescuers in their tasks and not meant to replace those humans when the time comes to perform actually rescue operations.

Disaster Robot Types

Disaster-Robot-BookThere are several types of disaster robot created for disaster and emergency applications. These include ground robots, water robots, and aerial robots. The aerial robots include fixed-wing and helicopter type drones. All of these various types of robots have been deployed in different disasters around the world and the team at CRASAR are continually working to refine their tools to make them better in both user interface and victim interactions.

Robin also offers to work with local organizations wishing to explore the use of a disaster robot in their training evolutions. The CRASAR team will deploy with a robot as long as they are able to have access to the data collected during the training. This is essential so that the team can continue to refine the hardware and software in their disaster robot devices.

Other Disaster Podcast Episodes on This Topic:

Unmanned Aerial Drones for Disaster Recon, Search and Rescue

Revisiting Robot USAR Applications During Disaster

—-

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

hospice disaster preparednessWhat can terminally ill patients in home care situations do to be ready for disaster? On this episode of the Disaster Podcast we talk about hospice disaster preparedness challenges. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined by Drs. Joe Holley and Arlyn LaBair to talk about how patients in special needs home care situations are at special risk from interruptions in services caused by natural and manmade disasters.

The panel talks about managing and documenting records of hospice and other home care patients in a community. This is the best way for emergency services in a community to be ready to know where the response and support is needed during an event. Creating databases of special needs patients helps to prepare for power outages where electrically driven medical equipment will begin to fail on short lived battery power.

Hospice disaster preparedness begins with home care agencies being prepared themselves for disasters. How these organizations and businesses prepare for their own preparedness impacts how they are able to continue servicing their at-risk clients. Durable medical equipment delivery and maintenance, oxygen suppliers, and other services will be interrupted for a period time. The duration of that interruption will impact patient comfort and, in some cases, survival.

During Hurricane Katrina several facilities and healthcare professionals had to make some very difficult decisions about patient care and outcomes when their equipment battery supplies began to dwindle. In some cases, the physicians had to prescribe lethal doses of pain medications to ease the patients into death painlessly. These difficult decisions happened when services were interrupted by the disaster for too long to sustain the patients any more.

—-

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-