From the monthly archives: "June 2014"

PODs_Lessons_LearnedDisaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley attended the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Preparedness Summit recently with the ProMed Network podcast studio. In this segment Sam got the chance to talk about pandemics and PODs (or Points Of Dispensing) with two groups.

First, Sam talked about standard or open PODs with Emergency Preparedness Coordinator for the City of Detroit, Andy Pickett, and Melissa McClung an epidemiologist from Denver Public Health. Then, in the second section, Sam talks about closed PODs with Dave Reddick, co-manager of the Bio-Defense Network and John Anthony from Sl. Louis County, Missouri.

Make sure you check back here often for all of the segments recorded in our podcast studio at the NACCHO Public Health Preparedness Summit.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

Subscribe to the Disaster Podcast –

itunes PodcastPodcast RSS Feed

—–

—-

First-Aid-KitThis week we talked about how we educate ourselves as EMS and disaster responders. How do we stay up with the latest science, and product knowledge for optimum patient care? Dr. Joe Holley recently attended the New York City Fire Department Special Operations conference and tells us about some of the disaster medical tools he was most impressed with.

Our friend Jim Logan jumped in with thoughts about different uses for equipment and the fact that newer products are small enough to be mobile, which is especially helpful in the austere environment. Equipment that was, not that long ago, experimental and expensive is now being used routinely in disaster work.

We discussed innovative new equipment to assist with cardiac arrest and bleeding control. What about diagnostics like ultrasound that can be plugged into a computer or tablet? We also have the ability to share video information with higher level medical providers off site. How do people learn about these devices? Training, especially on “real tissue” as we have experienced in the Paragon cadaver labs, gives the user a more realistic experience.

We ended with a teaser about the need for a different model in handling active shooter and MCI incidents with tactical EMS. What are the best practices and current thinking in this area? More to follow.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

Subscribe to the Disaster Podcast –

itunes PodcastPodcast RSS Feed

—–

Young businesswoman with a headache isolated on whiteIn this segment the Disaster Podcast Team looks at what it takes to keep responders going when the going gets mentally and emotionally tough. Emotional and mental health support for the responders themselves is perhaps one of the most important things to keep the teams in the field where they can do the most good.

This care starts with preparing teams for what they can expect when responding to a disaster scene. Training the crews in the manner they will respond and giving them realistic expectations of what they will see and encounter when on location can go a long way to helping them prepare for the stress of the disaster sites.

As the numbers of injuries and illnesses reported adds up, it can be an indicator of the overall readiness state of the team and their ability to function to peak efficiency. Eventually the team may need to take a break or pull themselves off the line for a time period to get back to a level of health that allows them to function again.

Team members also have to self assess and work through the aftermath when they return from a response deployment. Critical incident stress management programs help with this but it is also imperative that the disaster teams themselves monitor each other for signs of untreated stress and post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD).

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

Subscribe to the Disaster Podcast –

itunes PodcastPodcast RSS Feed

—–

Injury-Finger-BandageIn this segment the Disaster Podcast Team looks at what it takes to keep responders going when the going gets tough. Medical oversight and care for the disaster teams and responders themselves is perhaps one of the most important things to keep the teams in the field where they can do the most good.

This care starts with assessment before the deployment even begins as team members give a frank appraisal of their own health in order to avoid carrying an illness into the field and the close living quarters they’ll soon be living under. Once in the field, the most common problems revolve around foot care, bumps, aches and bruises as the teams begin the rigorous work to serve the communities affected by disasters.

As the numbers of injuries and illnesses reported adds up, it can be an indicator of the overall readiness state of the team and their ability to function to peak efficiency. Eventually the team may need to take a break or pull themselves off the line for a time period to get back to a level of health that allows them to function again.

Got a question for the Disaster Podcast Team? Why don’t you leave a comment below here on the site and we’ll get right back to you both in the comments area and by email, too! We look forward to hearing from you.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

—-

Subscribe to the Disaster Podcast –

itunes PodcastPodcast RSS Feed

—–