From the monthly archives: "February 2014"

Fire-Brigade-TrucksThis week’s episode of the Disaster Podcast is coming again from EMS Today 2014 in the Physio-Control Podcast Studio, the third of our special episodes produced there. In this segment, our host Sam Bradley is joined again by Dr. Joe Holley and paramedic Jim Logan from the Paragon Medical Education Group. Also joining them is Andrew Swartzell, captain and EMS coordinator for San Ramon Valley Fire District. Andy is also the Deputy Commander of DMAT California CA-6.

The discussion kicks off with a look at the challenges of responders self-deploying to a disaster situation. As Dr. Joe Holley points out, these self-deployed people are not prepared adequately and don’t have the back up and resources to support them long term. Without food, lodging and other support in place, these misguided responders become yet another part of the local community that needs support from the true disaster response teams. Jim says that these self deployed individuals become a huge safety issue and, in some cases, these people can actually impede the help from reaching the locations in needs.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Disaster_EMSToday_1This episode is the second of our special recorded segments from EMS Today 2014 in Washington, DC. We were in the ProMed Network podcast studio sponsored generously by Physio-Control, JEMS, and PennWell. Disaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are back with our episode partners from Paragon Medical Education Group. Jim Logan and Dr. Joe Holley bring their vast experience and knowledge to this segment yet again as we discuss tough things local responder preparedness as well as USAR and DMAT team members’ preparedness.

What kind of things do our specialty response teams need to bring with them to respond to these types of emergencies? Joe and Jim share their insights into what they need to bring with them to respond. They have to be ready to leave within 6 hours of notification so their bags have to be packed and ready to go on a moment’s notice.

 Joe also talks about what local responders need to have in their homes to be ready to go with their own response preparedness. He points out that MREs (Meals – Ready to Eat) and other survival gear are readily available now through online resources like Amazon. Jamie is asked how he and his family prepare for being isolated by winter or summer storms in the mid-Atlantic area of the U.S. He shares his resources that he keeps on hand for those times when he might be without power for a period of time.

Again, a special thank-you to Paragon Medical Education Group for their continued support of this podcast as our partners in this endeavor to bring disaster medicine to you. Check out their page and educational resources that can help your system be more prepared for what happens in your area.

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Train-CrashLast week the Disaster Podcast host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic along with co-host Sam Bradley sat down with Dr. Holley and Jim Logan from Paragon Medical Education Group to talk about their educational experience program at EMS Today. The focus is on the importance of training.

Stress Immersion Training Explained

Disaster responders like all responders, need training specific to what they are expected to do and experience in a deployment. The need to be able to not only take care of the communities to which they respond, they also need to be able to care for themselves and their team mates at the same time. Jim Logan says the best training is something he calls “Stress Immersion” which most closely resembles the things they’ll actually encounter in the field.

The Cadaver Lab conducted by Paragon Education Group at EMS Today is a great example of the type of class in which you get this “stress immersion” training. Those basic skills that are often relegated to the low-man on the team are still essential skills to be mastered and practiced. Joe Holley also points out that a disaster responder needs to not only know how to do something but also why they do a particular intervention.

In disaster response situations, the USAR (Urban Search and Rescue) teams and the DMAT (Disaster Medical Aid Team) members all need to be self-reliant and learn to manage and treat patients without the common supplies or resources commonly available in the hospital. You don’t have expensive imaging tools, diagnostic machines, or even lab work in some situations. The disaster responder is forced to fall back on basic skills and history taking to make diagnostic, treatment, and transport decisions.

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flood damaged propertyIn this episode of the Disaster Podcast, hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley bring back Dr. Joe Holley and paramedic Jim Logan to look at some of the future topics to be covered on the show. It’s one thing to say this show will be about different disasters and the responders who travel to manage their aftermath, but what does that really mean?

It means that their are endless topics that could be covered and the Disaster Podcast team talks about what some of them will be in the coming weeks on the show. Of course we’ll always try to bring you updates about ongoing disaster relief efforts around the world from the unique perspective of experienced responders like Dr. Holley and Jim Logan from Paragon Medical Education Group. They focus on taking their perspective from responses around the country and passing along that knowledge to others in the educational sessions and programs they bring to conferences and organizations.

Help Us Pick Future Episode Topics

Among the topics discussed this week are some special episodes on austere or disaster medicine and how it differs from medical care in normal situations. We’ll also be looking at the aftermath of response on responders themselves and how to better prepare our disaster response teams for what they’ll see when they get to disaster ravaged areas.

The most important thing we want to do on the show each week is focus on topics that come from our audience. This means you, the person reading this episode show notes post can help us create future episodes with your comments and suggestions for topics you’d like to see. Leave a comment below reach out to us on twitter or Facebook. We look forward to hearing from you!

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