Joe Holley Cadaver Research in CPRIn this special episode, we talk about what it takes to create a customized, large-scale drill for training first responders and you community health services in the event of a disaster, man-made or natural. We focus especially on how the gang at Paragon Medical Education Group assemble their customized training experiences.

Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon walks co-host Sam Bradley through a hypothetical active shooter drill in a suburban community. We talk about working with all local resources, bringing in stake-holders, and lining up opportunities to train local educators for first responders.

Joining Joe and Sam on this episode are co-host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Becky DePodwin.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

On this episode we invited Andy Gienapp, MS, NRP, Manager of the Office of Emergency Medical Services, Health Readiness and Response Section, Public Health Division, Wyoming Department of Health. We invited Andy on to discuss the potential demise of many rural EMS services mostly staffed by volunteers.

Not only are there fewer volunteers available, but call volume and expense of maintaining certifications and training have all created an issue across the U.S. in rural even suburban EMS services. The problem will likely get worse before it gets better and the public outcry will be ugly when the tipping point is reached.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

On this episode we bring you a blast from the past. As I mentioned last week, the Disaster Podcast team is either all traveling, working, or in the process of moving and we struggled to get together for a new episode, let alone two for last week and this one. So we will bring you an episode of relevant content from the past 7 years on the show.

We got a lot of response from our recent episode with Daniel Zehner from the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) on Hurricane Dorian and construction resilience in the face of powerful storms like that. In light of that, here’s the very first episode we did with Daniel about the NHERI program and research that you might find very interesting. Enjoy!

Daniel Zehner from the DesignSafe Radio podcast joins us on the Disaster Podcast this week. He highlights the research opportunities at NHERI for the major hazard areas they look into: wind, earthquakes, tsunami, coastal erosion, and rapid response after events.  His podcast program focuses on the important work of the team at the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI). NHERI is committed to making sure the next natural hazard doesn’t have to be a disaster for you and your family.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

On this episode we bring you a blast from the past. For the next two weeks, the Disaster Podcast team is either all traveling, working, or in the process of moving and we struggled to get together for a new episode, let alone two. So we will bring you an episode of relevant content from the past 7 years on the show.

With the jet stream dipping down from the arctic again this week, it’s time to review our cold weather preparedness and emergency management and treatment so let’s catch up with an episode on that for you. We have Dr. Joe Holley and Cohost Sam Bradley on the call, along with me, Jamie Davis. Enjoy!

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

wildland-firefighting-forest-wildfiresOn the show this week are Disaster Podcast host, Jamie Davis, Dr. Joe Holley, and our two disaster weather experts, Becky DePodwin and Kyle Nelson. We discuss the raging wildfires in California and the weather conditions that fuel them this time of year. Kyle and Becky cover the origins of the Santa Ana and Diablo winds in Nevada and Utah, fire behavior in the hilly back country around southern California and more.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

Dave Grovdahl, EMS Division Head, Onslow County EMS in North Carolina, joins the Disaster Podcast team to talk about his recent presentation findings surrounding his system’s preparations and response to Hurricane’s Florence and Dorian. He shares some of the key things they did to help stage EMS teams for their response during major storms and flooding.

Dave also talks about the wellness physically and mentally of his EMS crews during the multi-day events, as well as the effects the aftermath of the storms weeks and months afterward. Teams experienced stress from being staged together with their teams in close proximity for 5 days or more as well as the stress associated with 11 team members suffering near total structural losses of their homes during Florence while deployed.

In an effort to help spread the word on system and community preparedness and resilience, Dave is willing to chat with leaders in other systems about Onslow County’s planning for storms. Contact Dave by email at David_Grovdahl@OnslowCountyNC.Gov.

On the show this week are Disaster Podcast host, Jamie Davis, who’s joined by Kyle Nelson, our meteorologist, along with co-host Sam Bradley.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

Daniel Zehner from the DesignSafe Radio podcast joins us on the Disaster Podcast this week. He highlights the research from NHERI (Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure) that looked at the damage from Hurricane Dorian.

The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Structural Extreme Events Reconnaissance (StEER) Network gathered data immediately following Dorian’s impact on the northern islands of the Bahamas. The StEER Network data map can be found here.

On the podcast we discuss the sensationalized reports from some media outlets. The StEER recon after the storm showed 45% of the islands’ structures as a total loss, but it also showed structural “wins” where resilient construction techniques built structures that withstood the storm impacts. These structures can be used to demonstrate construction options to adopt when rebuilding the islands’ infrastructure.

On the show this week are Disaster Podcast host, Jamie Davis, who’s joined by Kyle Nelson, our meteorologist, along with co-host Sam Bradley.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

 

Fenix PD35TAC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Original article published at https://wildsafety.com/fenix-pd35tac-review/

Disclaimer:

I was sent this product at no charge, with the expectation of writing a product review.

Product Description from the manufacturer:

The Fenix PD35TAC (Tactical Edition) remains a pocket-size tactical flashlight but has a higher performance and focuses on tactical employment, compared to its predecessor the Fenix PD35. Fenix has taken the all-time bestselling PD35 LED flashlight and added some innovative user features to enhance its tactical capabilities. Measured at less than 5.51 inches, the Fenix PD35TAC flashlight features a 1000-lumen maximum output and has an impressive beam distance of up to 656 feet. The Fenix PD35TAC operates using a single 18650 battery or two CR123A batteries.

The Fenix PD35TAC features two general modes: Tactical Mode and Outdoor Mode. In the Outdoor Mode, the Fenix PD35 Tactical Edition delivers up to 6 output modes for maximum functionality. However, the Tactical Mode strengthens the PD35TAC with a simplified and faster operation. Perfect for outdoor use, professional use, security, & law enforcement, you can count on the PD35TAC to deliver reliable, powerful lighting for a wide range of situations.

Initial Impressions:

The packaging of the PD35TAC is on par with similar products – easy to open, without needing the Jaws of Life to extract the product from 500 layers of skin-shredding hardened plastic. Included in the box are the operating instructions, a belt clip, two CR123A non-rechargeable batteries, a nylon holster, spare O-rings, and a lanyard.

After inserting the included batteries, I immediately noticed how much this light defies the gravitational pull of the Universe. Weighing in at a mere 3.1 ounces (before batteries) meant I could skip arm days at the gym for awhile, and would still be able to hold it in position to light up a pasture for a few weeks.

Operation is simple and intuitive, with minimal time needed to figure out the two buttons: the main (rear) ON/OFF press-type button, and a smaller button near the front of the light for cycling through the five illumination levels. Compared to the discontinued Fenix UC40, which I’ve had for years and love (minus the power button location and operation), the PD35TAC quickly became my GO-TO light for several applications. The manufacturer explains the two different operating modes in exquisite detail, but “PRESS THE BUTTON AND THERE IS LIGHT” worked well enough for me to begin an hour-long experiment on discovering how quickly I could cause instant migraine-level headaches on everyone within a 1-mile radius of my back door – mainly because…

This thing is bright – and by bright, I’m talking ONE THOUSAND LUMENS. I remember re-reading the specifications on the manufacturer’s website because I thought there was a misprint in the included instructions, and my brain refused to cooperate. After doing the stupidest thing imaginable with this mini light saber – yes, I looked right at it and lost track of several days – I immediately became a believer upon my return to consciousness.

This tree (that you can’t see) is roughly 200 feet away, under a clear night sky.

 

This is the same tree, at the same distance, illuminated with the Fenix PD35TAC

OK, so the thing is light, and super bright. That’s nice and all, but how well does it actually work for real-world applications? I wanted to find out, so I beat it up for several weeks in the Texas heat, and was very pleased with how well it held up. Honestly, it held up so well it still looks like I just took it out of the box.

Initially, I used it around the house for a few days to test the brightness selector. There’s nothing worse than needing a little bit of extra illumination to check what temperature the thermostat is set to, and getting an instant migraine because you turned on the sun a few inches from your eyes. If you don’t want a migraine from this thing, re-read the instructions when your sight returns so you don’t get confused with the two operating modes. Once you realize how easy that is, you’re set.

Once I was used to switching the brightness level quickly, which isn’t difficult at all, I took it out to the ranch for some lengthy real-world testing. I have a 900 lumen Surefire X300 rifle light mounted to my Smith & Wesson AR-10 to help with feral pig eradication on a 200-acre ranch, and I wanted to see how it compared to a $300 Surefire at lighting up the dark Texas nights – I was not disappointed. Not only was the PD35TAC brighter, but it didn’t burn my hand after having on full brightness for 15 minutes – something I’m used to with the older UC40 I mentioned earlier. Halfway through the night’s activities, it started to rain, first at a slow drizzle, soon turning into a massive downpour. At no point was I ever worried that I would drop the light due to it or my hand being wet. While there is no rubber or other non-metal material for offering a secure grip, none is needed. Compared to other flashlights I’ve used over the years that have a check-marked grip that usually fail to do anything other than look impressive, the way the body of this light is designed offers a sure grip with and without gloves under wet conditions.

Luckily the PD35TAC is waterproof to IPX-8 standard (underwater up to 6 1/2 feet for 30 minutes), since it was accidentally dropped in a muddy cow pasture during a downpour a few times. Feeling adventurous after the first few accidental drops, I tossed it into the air a few times to see how it would handle a drop into mud from roughly 30 feet in the air. After fishing it out of a large puddle, it looked at me with a sneer as if to tell me I hadn’t begun to test its limitations – so I dropped it into a cow paddy and stepped on it a few times to show I wasn’t messing around this time. After I found it and wiped it off, it behaved as though I just removed it from the box for the first time (minus the added aroma, which was more than likely emanating from my hand, not the flashlight.)

A few hours before daylight, I decided to test the strobe function, and I was very impressed to discover that the strobe operates at 1,000 lumens, and is quite noticeable from at least a mile away. I know this because I drove an exact mile after setting down on the top of a fence post. Some flashlights that offer a strobe function limit the brightness in an effort to save on power consumption, but not the PD35TAC.

As a side note, the manufacturer lists a “low-voltage reminder” in the product specifications, and for the third time that night, I was made aware that it was time again to change the batteries. Having kept the setting on the brightest lumen mode throughout multiple nights of romping through cow patties, this feature proved invaluable. The stated time of 1 hour, 10 minutes for continuous use on the highest output if fairly accurate.

Overall Impression:

The Fenix PD35TAC now has a permanent place in my pocket, field pack, and truck (once I purchase a few more of these bad boys.) For an MSRP of $94.00 $71.95, this flashlight is worth every penny. I’m also ordering a few accessories

The only change I would consider suggesting, provided it wouldn’t interfere with its otherwise very impressive performance, is adding a USB charging port for when using the rechargeable 18650 battery. Although that isn’t a show-stopper, I would consider it icing on the proverbial cake.

Do yourself a favor and get one of these before they’re sold out.

https://www.fenix-store.com/fenix-pd35tac-led-flashlight-tactical-edition/

Hurricane Dorian Preview map 5 days outFlorida Search and Rescue Incident Commander Michael McGill talks about his organization’s response to help get rescuers to victims during and after the impact of Hurricane Dorian. He focuses on their use of internet-based radio functionality and other online resources to answer calls for help.

On the show this week are Disaster Podcast host, Jamie Davis, who’s joined by Kyle Nelson, our meteorologist, along with co-host Sam Bradley, and Dr. Joe Holley.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.

TNTF-1-USAR-Team-Mexico-BeachFlorida Search and Rescue Incident Commander Michael McGill comes on the Disaster Podcast to talk about management of volunteer search and rescue groups during disaster response. Florida SAR is an all-volunteer organization that holds itself to a high standard for training and accountability.

Mike talks with the podcast team about his experiences working alongside other organizations, working with state, local, and Federal agencies, the importance of a memorandum of understanding to legitimacy, and much more.

On the show this week are Disaster Podcast host, Jamie Davis, who’s joined by Kyle Nelson, our meteorologist, along with co-host Sam Bradley, and Dr. Joe Holley.

Join the Discussion


Join the discussion after the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis, the Podmedic in our Disaster Podcast Facebook Group now!



Paragon Brings “The Experience”

Paragon Medical Education Group

Paragon Medical Education Group specializes in bringing what they call “The Experience” to jurisdictions around the country. They bring together police, fire, EMS, and hospital teams to train together and learn what to expect from each diverse group in the response team so that each knows what to expect from the other and how to back the other groups up. Visit Paragon’s site at ParagonMedicalGroup.com for more information on how this can be brought into your system.